Alaska Medical Marijuana Laws & Regulations Alaska Medical Marijuana Law

Safe access to medical cannabis was first approved in Alaska by Measure 8 (1998), an initiative that was supported by 58 percent of voters. Measure 8 created a legal defense to non-registered patients and those who can demonstrate adequate need to possess large quantities of medical marijuana. Alaska Senate Bill 94 was passed in June 1999, modified the law created by Measure 8, removing legal protections for medical marijuana patients who refuse to register with the state health department, or who possess greater amounts of marijuana than authorized by state law. Codified under Alaska Statute Title 17, Chapter 37: "Medical Uses of Marijuana", the law is officially known as the Medical Uses of Marijuana for Persons Suffering from Debilitating Medical Conditions Act.

Laws:

Measure 8

The voter initiative, approved in 1998 by 58 percent of voters, created Alaska's medical marijuana law, which affords a legal defense to non-registered patients and those who can demonstrate adequate need to possess large quantities of medical marijuana.

Alaska Senate Bill 94

This bill, passed in June 1999, modifies the law created by Measure 8, removing legal protections for medical marijuana patients who refuse to register with the state health department, or who possess greater amounts of marijuana than authorized by state law.

The current, enforced version of the law:

Alaska Statute Title 17, Chapter 37: "Medical Uses of Marijuana"

Regulations:

The regulations contained on medical marijuana in the Alaska Administrative Code are found in Chapter 17.37. “MEDICAL USES OF MARIJUANA.” These rules are essentially a restatement of the state’s medical marijuana statute and leaves discretionary authority on patient application and card fees up to the Department of Health and Social Services.

Alaska Admin. Code 17 § 37