Lack of Patient Protection Gets Colorado a "B" Grade in Medical Marijuana

By Thomas Mitchell for Westword

Despite new laws allowing easier access to medical marijuana, Colorado couldn't improve its B grade in an annual report card from a national cannabis advocacy organization.

Each year since 2015, Americans for Safe Access has issued a lengthy report card for every U.S. state and territory's medical marijuana programs, or lack thereof. While the seventeen states that haven't legalized medical marijuana or severely limit its access got automatic Fs in this year's edition; As were hard to attain, with just Illinois and Oregon making the grade.

Colorado found itself in the middle with the Cs and Bs, trailing states such as Hawaii, Maine, Massachusetts and Oklahoma, among others. The state's 82.8/100 score was just two points higher than 2018's report card, despite passing new laws adding conditions eligible for medical marijuana (autism and any condition for which opioids are prescribed), and permitting dentists, psychiatrists, registered nurse practitioners and other healthcare professionals to recommend medical marijuana. Another law passed allowing parents of child patients to purchase medication more easily on their child's behalf, as well.