Oregon Legal Information

In 1998, Oregon voters approved the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act (OMMA), allowing a patient with a valid ID card to use, possess, and cultivate cannabis for medicinal purposes, and designate a primary caregiver to assist them. Qualifying patients may possess up to 24 ounces of usable cannabis and may cultivate up to 24 plants (6 mature, 18 immature). To be protected from arrest, patients must enroll in the Oregon Health Authority patient registry and possess a valid Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) identification card. Non-registered patients with a valid recommendation who are within the possession or cultivation limits set by the OMMA are entitled to an affirmative defense. In August 2013, House Bill 3460 established regulations for state-licensed medical cannabis facilities; as of April 2014, 58 licenses have been approved. In March 2014, Senate Bill 1531 granted cities and counties the right to pass moratoriums on the opening of medical marijuana facilities until May 1, 2015.


In This Section

Oregon's Medical Marijuana Laws & Regulations

The Oregon Medical Marijuana Act (OMMA) was passed by Oregon voters on November 3, 1998, and went into effect on December 3, 1998.

Facing state or federal charges?

Unfortunately, patients, caregivers, and providers are still vulnerable to federal and state arrests, prosecutions, and incarceration. They also suffer pervasive discrimination in employment, child custody, housing, public accommodation, education and medical care.

Becoming a Patient in Oregon

A patient with a valid ID card may use marijuana for medicinal purposes and the patient can designate a primary caregiver to help them with their medicine. Patients may possess "paraphernalia" such as pipes, water pipes, vaporizers, in order to use their medicine. Patients must enroll in the state patient registry and possess a valid identification card in order to be legally protected.

Recommending Cannabis in Oregon

Medical professionals recommending medical cannabis must be a doctor of medicine (MD) or doctor of osteopathy (DO) licensed to practice medicine in Oregon that has a valid license to practice medicine in Oregon and has no disqualifying restrictions. Naturopaths, chiropractors and nurse practitioners cannot write recommendations.

OR Caregiver, Producer & Provider Info

Every state has varying laws and regulations for caregivers, cultivators and medical cannabis providers. This section includes an overview of state requirements and links to necessary forms and applications.