Missouri Legal Information

In 2014, Missouri passed HB 2238, which creates a legal right for certain patients to obtain, possess, and use “hemp extracts” in limited circumstances. The law defines a “hemp extract” as a preparation of cannabis that contains at least 5% CBD and no more than 0.3% THC. Only patients with a seizure disorder and a recommendation from a neurologist are eligible to obtain a “hemp registration card,” which entitles them to access and legal protections. Patients are allowed to purchase hemp extracts from two state-regulated “Cannabidiol oil care centers.” The law also allows the Department of Agriculture to license and regulate growers of cannabis plants to produce the oil to make sure they conform to the CBD and THC stipulations.


In This Section

Missouri Medical Marijuana Laws and Regulations

In 2014, Missouri passed HB 2238, which creates a legal right for certain patients to obtain, possess, and use “hemp extracts” in limited circumstances. The law defines a “hemp extract” as a preparation of cannabis that contains at least 5% CBD and no more than 0.3% THC.

Becoming a patient in Missouri

Only patients with intractable epilepsy are eligible for legal protections in Missouri. In order for a patient with intractable epilepsy to be enrolled in the program, they must obtain a written recommendation from a neurologist.

Recommending Cannabis in Missouri

Only neurologists who are licensed in Missouri may issue a written recommendation to a patient to threat intractable epilepsy with CBD oil.

Missouri Caregiver, Producer and Provider Info

There are no provisions for caregivers under HB 2238; however, a parent or legal guardian must be the registered cardholder for a patient under the age of 18. HB 2238 does include provisions for producers and providers of CBD oil (known under Missouri law as "hemp extract").

Facing state or federal charges?

Unfortunately, patients, caregivers, and providers are still vulnerable to federal and state arrests, prosecutions, and incarceration. They also suffer pervasive discrimination in employment, child custody, housing, public accommodation, education and medical care.