Kentucky Legal Information

In 2014, the Kentucky legislature revised the definition of marijuana under state law to create legal protection for patients who use a cannabidiol (CBD) medicine as part of an approved clinical trial or on the written order of “a physician practicing at a hospital or associated clinic affiliated with a Kentucky public university having a college or school of medicine.” The law does not create a production or distribution model within Kentucky, so patients with a qualifying Kentucky physician’s recommendation can only obtain their medicine by traveling to a medical cannabis state that both has production of CBD medicines and would recognize a Kentucky physician’s order as valid. States that offer reciprocity for medical cannabis patients who are not residents typically require a valid medical cannabis registry ID card, which Kentucky does not currently offer.


In This Section

Kentucky Medical Marijuana Laws and Regulations

In 2014, the Kentucky legislature revised the definition of marijuana under state law to create legal protection for patients who use a cannabidiol (CBD) medicine as part of an approved clinical trial or on the written order of “a physician practicing at a hospital or associated clinic affiliated with a Kentucky public university having a college or school of medicine.”

Becoming a patient in Kentucky

Under SB 124, a patient can become a patient simply by obtain a written order for CBD from a physician practicing at a hospital or associated clinic affiliated with a Kentucky public university having a college or school of medicine.

Recommending Cannabis in Kentucky

A physician practicing at a hospital or associated clinic affiliated with a Kentucky public university having a college or school of medicine may issue a written order for CBD to a patient.

Kentucky Caregiver, Producer and Provider Info

The are no caregivers providers, or producers under SB 124. The law does not explain how patients can obtain CBD for therapeutic use.

Facing state or federal charges?

Unfortunately, patients, caregivers, and providers are still vulnerable to federal and state arrests, prosecutions, and incarceration. They also suffer pervasive discrimination in employment, child custody, housing, public accommodation, education and medical care.